Communicating Surfaces

Communicating Surfaces (TU/e)
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Communicating Surfaces (TU/e)

Keywords

Tactile surfaces, Haptics, Responsive coating, Liquid crystal polymer network

Papers

'Protruding organic surfaces triggered by in-plane electric fields' by dr. Danqing Lui, dr. Nicholas B. Tito and prof. Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Nat. Comm., 2017, 8, 1526.]

Abstract

Dynamically control over surface topologies in (sub) micrometer range has many possibilities in modern applications. For example the optical properties of thin films and coatings are largely affected by transformations in surface structure and shape. By controlling the surface topology lens structures can be formed in an autonomous manner and their focusing depth might adapt to an external stimulus such as the light and its directionality. Also the mechanical properties can be altered by the appearance or disappearance of protrusions in the surface, such as friction, stick and adhesion. In microfluidic applications mixing can be generated by surface topologies in the microchannels. Moreover, it is possible to control the wettability of surfaces by sub-micron surface reliefs.



In this project we are interested in designing light responsive coatings that by forming/ erasing the surface topographic structures deliver tactile feedback. Light is selected as the trigger due to its easy accessibility and can be addressed remotely. In order to provide adequate changes for the touch sensation. The light responsiveness needs to strive towards a ‘faster, higher, stronger’ deformation. This means the switching speed of 10 Hz, formed structures in few micro-meter height and mechanically reliable coating needs to be developed. 

Liquid secretion materials

On-target triggered liquid secretion materials are essential for medicine and energy. A responsive coating that can secrete fluids reversibly and repeatedly under the control of light is developed. The principle is based on creating a porous smectic liquid crystal network in which the fluids are homogenously distributed. The smectic liquid crystal network is provided with light-responsive azobenzene moieties. Upon illumination with UV light, the copolymerized azobenzene moieties undergo trans-to-cis conversion. This may cause a contraction along the coating and mechanically squeezes out the initially locked fluids. The secretion can be integral over the whole surface or can be localized by selective exposure, localizing azobenzene distribution, and creating complex molecular configurations. The liquid secretion is reversible that upon illumination with visible light, the initial highly ordered liquid crystal networks are retained and the released fluids are reabsorbed. The on-demand released liquids have many potential applications, including drugs delivery, agriculture, antifouling coatings, marine industry and personal care.

Figure. Reversible liquid secretion under the control of light.

Reference

'Photoresponsive sponge-like coating for on-demand liquid release' by Anne Helene Gelebart, Danqing Liu, Dirk J. Mulder, Kevin H. J. Leunissen, Jop van Gerven, Albert P. H. J. Schenning, and Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Advanced Functional Materials, 2018, 28, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.1705942]

Short Biography Wanshu Zhang - Postdoc

Wanshu Zhang received her doctoral degree in Engineering in January, 2018 at the University of Science and Technology Beijing in China. Her PhD study of cholesteric liquid crystal materials was conducted at Peking University, College of Engineering in China based on a cooperation research. In 2018 she joined Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry in Netherlands working as a postdoc in on-demand liquid secretion materials within the 4TU. High-Tech Materials research programme 'New Horizons in Designer Materials'.

Short Biography Danqing Liu - Project leader

Danqing Liu received her master degree in Electrical Engineering in 2008 at the Delft University in The Netherlands. Her Ph.D. study of responsive polymers was conducted at Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering. In 2013 she joined the Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the same university working as postdoctoral student on new mechanisms of surface activation. From 2015 she is Research Fellow at the Institute of Complex Molecular Systems in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

Communicating Surfaces (TU/e)

Keywords

Tactile surfaces, Haptics, Responsive coating, Liquid crystal polymer network

Papers

'Protruding organic surfaces triggered by in-plane electric fields' by dr. Danqing Lui, dr. Nicholas B. Tito and prof. Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Nat. Comm., 2017, 8, 1526.]

Abstract

Dynamically control over surface topologies in (sub) micrometer range has many possibilities in modern applications. For example the optical properties of thin films and coatings are largely affected by transformations in surface structure and shape. By controlling the surface topology lens structures can be formed in an autonomous manner and their focusing depth might adapt to an external stimulus such as the light and its directionality. Also the mechanical properties can be altered by the appearance or disappearance of protrusions in the surface, such as friction, stick and adhesion. In microfluidic applications mixing can be generated by surface topologies in the microchannels. Moreover, it is possible to control the wettability of surfaces by sub-micron surface reliefs.



In this project we are interested in designing light responsive coatings that by forming/ erasing the surface topographic structures deliver tactile feedback. Light is selected as the trigger due to its easy accessibility and can be addressed remotely. In order to provide adequate changes for the touch sensation. The light responsiveness needs to strive towards a ‘faster, higher, stronger’ deformation. This means the switching speed of 10 Hz, formed structures in few micro-meter height and mechanically reliable coating needs to be developed. 

Liquid secretion materials

On-target triggered liquid secretion materials are essential for medicine and energy. A responsive coating that can secrete fluids reversibly and repeatedly under the control of light is developed. The principle is based on creating a porous smectic liquid crystal network in which the fluids are homogenously distributed. The smectic liquid crystal network is provided with light-responsive azobenzene moieties. Upon illumination with UV light, the copolymerized azobenzene moieties undergo trans-to-cis conversion. This may cause a contraction along the coating and mechanically squeezes out the initially locked fluids. The secretion can be integral over the whole surface or can be localized by selective exposure, localizing azobenzene distribution, and creating complex molecular configurations. The liquid secretion is reversible that upon illumination with visible light, the initial highly ordered liquid crystal networks are retained and the released fluids are reabsorbed. The on-demand released liquids have many potential applications, including drugs delivery, agriculture, antifouling coatings, marine industry and personal care.

Figure. Reversible liquid secretion under the control of light.

Reference

'Photoresponsive sponge-like coating for on-demand liquid release' by Anne Helene Gelebart, Danqing Liu, Dirk J. Mulder, Kevin H. J. Leunissen, Jop van Gerven, Albert P. H. J. Schenning, and Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Advanced Functional Materials, 2018, 28, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.1705942]

Short Biography Wanshu Zhang - Postdoc

Wanshu Zhang received her doctoral degree in Engineering in January, 2018 at the University of Science and Technology Beijing in China. Her PhD study of cholesteric liquid crystal materials was conducted at Peking University, College of Engineering in China based on a cooperation research. In 2018 she joined Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry in Netherlands working as a postdoc in on-demand liquid secretion materials within the 4TU. High-Tech Materials research programme 'New Horizons in Designer Materials'.

Short Biography Danqing Liu - Project leader

Danqing Liu received her master degree in Electrical Engineering in 2008 at the Delft University in The Netherlands. Her Ph.D. study of responsive polymers was conducted at Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering. In 2013 she joined the Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the same university working as postdoctoral student on new mechanisms of surface activation. From 2015 she is Research Fellow at the Institute of Complex Molecular Systems in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

Communicating Surfaces

Communicating Surfaces (TU/e)

Keywords

Tactile surfaces, Haptics, Responsive coating, Liquid crystal polymer network

Papers

'Protruding organic surfaces triggered by in-plane electric fields' by dr. Danqing Lui, dr. Nicholas B. Tito and prof. Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Nat. Comm., 2017, 8, 1526.]

Abstract

Dynamically control over surface topologies in (sub) micrometer range has many possibilities in modern applications. For example the optical properties of thin films and coatings are largely affected by transformations in surface structure and shape. By controlling the surface topology lens structures can be formed in an autonomous manner and their focusing depth might adapt to an external stimulus such as the light and its directionality. Also the mechanical properties can be altered by the appearance or disappearance of protrusions in the surface, such as friction, stick and adhesion. In microfluidic applications mixing can be generated by surface topologies in the microchannels. Moreover, it is possible to control the wettability of surfaces by sub-micron surface reliefs.



In this project we are interested in designing light responsive coatings that by forming/ erasing the surface topographic structures deliver tactile feedback. Light is selected as the trigger due to its easy accessibility and can be addressed remotely. In order to provide adequate changes for the touch sensation. The light responsiveness needs to strive towards a ‘faster, higher, stronger’ deformation. This means the switching speed of 10 Hz, formed structures in few micro-meter height and mechanically reliable coating needs to be developed. 

Liquid secretion materials

On-target triggered liquid secretion materials are essential for medicine and energy. A responsive coating that can secrete fluids reversibly and repeatedly under the control of light is developed. The principle is based on creating a porous smectic liquid crystal network in which the fluids are homogenously distributed. The smectic liquid crystal network is provided with light-responsive azobenzene moieties. Upon illumination with UV light, the copolymerized azobenzene moieties undergo trans-to-cis conversion. This may cause a contraction along the coating and mechanically squeezes out the initially locked fluids. The secretion can be integral over the whole surface or can be localized by selective exposure, localizing azobenzene distribution, and creating complex molecular configurations. The liquid secretion is reversible that upon illumination with visible light, the initial highly ordered liquid crystal networks are retained and the released fluids are reabsorbed. The on-demand released liquids have many potential applications, including drugs delivery, agriculture, antifouling coatings, marine industry and personal care.

Figure. Reversible liquid secretion under the control of light.

Reference

'Photoresponsive sponge-like coating for on-demand liquid release' by Anne Helene Gelebart, Danqing Liu, Dirk J. Mulder, Kevin H. J. Leunissen, Jop van Gerven, Albert P. H. J. Schenning, and Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Advanced Functional Materials, 2018, 28, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.1705942]

Short Biography Wanshu Zhang - Postdoc

Wanshu Zhang received her doctoral degree in Engineering in January, 2018 at the University of Science and Technology Beijing in China. Her PhD study of cholesteric liquid crystal materials was conducted at Peking University, College of Engineering in China based on a cooperation research. In 2018 she joined Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry in Netherlands working as a postdoc in on-demand liquid secretion materials within the 4TU. High-Tech Materials research programme 'New Horizons in Designer Materials'.

Short Biography Danqing Liu - Project leader

Danqing Liu received her master degree in Electrical Engineering in 2008 at the Delft University in The Netherlands. Her Ph.D. study of responsive polymers was conducted at Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering. In 2013 she joined the Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the same university working as postdoctoral student on new mechanisms of surface activation. From 2015 she is Research Fellow at the Institute of Complex Molecular Systems in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

Communicating Surfaces (TU/e)

Keywords

Tactile surfaces, Haptics, Responsive coating, Liquid crystal polymer network

Papers

'Protruding organic surfaces triggered by in-plane electric fields' by dr. Danqing Lui, dr. Nicholas B. Tito and prof. Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Nat. Comm., 2017, 8, 1526.]

Abstract

Dynamically control over surface topologies in (sub) micrometer range has many possibilities in modern applications. For example the optical properties of thin films and coatings are largely affected by transformations in surface structure and shape. By controlling the surface topology lens structures can be formed in an autonomous manner and their focusing depth might adapt to an external stimulus such as the light and its directionality. Also the mechanical properties can be altered by the appearance or disappearance of protrusions in the surface, such as friction, stick and adhesion. In microfluidic applications mixing can be generated by surface topologies in the microchannels. Moreover, it is possible to control the wettability of surfaces by sub-micron surface reliefs.



In this project we are interested in designing light responsive coatings that by forming/ erasing the surface topographic structures deliver tactile feedback. Light is selected as the trigger due to its easy accessibility and can be addressed remotely. In order to provide adequate changes for the touch sensation. The light responsiveness needs to strive towards a ‘faster, higher, stronger’ deformation. This means the switching speed of 10 Hz, formed structures in few micro-meter height and mechanically reliable coating needs to be developed. 

Liquid secretion materials

On-target triggered liquid secretion materials are essential for medicine and energy. A responsive coating that can secrete fluids reversibly and repeatedly under the control of light is developed. The principle is based on creating a porous smectic liquid crystal network in which the fluids are homogenously distributed. The smectic liquid crystal network is provided with light-responsive azobenzene moieties. Upon illumination with UV light, the copolymerized azobenzene moieties undergo trans-to-cis conversion. This may cause a contraction along the coating and mechanically squeezes out the initially locked fluids. The secretion can be integral over the whole surface or can be localized by selective exposure, localizing azobenzene distribution, and creating complex molecular configurations. The liquid secretion is reversible that upon illumination with visible light, the initial highly ordered liquid crystal networks are retained and the released fluids are reabsorbed. The on-demand released liquids have many potential applications, including drugs delivery, agriculture, antifouling coatings, marine industry and personal care.

Figure. Reversible liquid secretion under the control of light.

Reference

'Photoresponsive sponge-like coating for on-demand liquid release' by Anne Helene Gelebart, Danqing Liu, Dirk J. Mulder, Kevin H. J. Leunissen, Jop van Gerven, Albert P. H. J. Schenning, and Dirk J. Broer (TU/e).
[Advanced Functional Materials, 2018, 28, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.1705942]

Short Biography Wanshu Zhang - Postdoc

Wanshu Zhang received her doctoral degree in Engineering in January, 2018 at the University of Science and Technology Beijing in China. Her PhD study of cholesteric liquid crystal materials was conducted at Peking University, College of Engineering in China based on a cooperation research. In 2018 she joined Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry in Netherlands working as a postdoc in on-demand liquid secretion materials within the 4TU. High-Tech Materials research programme 'New Horizons in Designer Materials'.

Short Biography Danqing Liu - Project leader

Danqing Liu received her master degree in Electrical Engineering in 2008 at the Delft University in The Netherlands. Her Ph.D. study of responsive polymers was conducted at Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering. In 2013 she joined the Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the same university working as postdoctoral student on new mechanisms of surface activation. From 2015 she is Research Fellow at the Institute of Complex Molecular Systems in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.