Design United

Design United, the 4TU research centre for design, enhances the innovative strength of the Dutch creative industry by bridging the gap between design research and the design community.
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Latest updates

News
Shaking hands with the Future on BRIGHT TV
Shaking hands with the Future on BRIGHT TV
Last week BRIGHT TV filmed the project Shaking hands with the Future at the Social Robotics Lab in the A-Lab in Amsterdam. The project will also be exhibited at Mind the Step at the Dutch Design Week from 17 - 25 October.
Wednesday 16 September 2015
News
IoT Design Manifesto
IoT Design Manifesto
As our everyday becomes increasingly connected, the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering has taken on the challenge of how to design meaningfully and responsibly in a connected world. As opposed to merely looking at products in terms of efficiency or profit, IDE designers are trained to be sensitive to how products fit into our lives and society at large. And more and more, they are in a position to bring those considerations to bear on how a product is developed. This commitment to design for our future in the vast and unknown territory of the Internet of Things has already produced a Design Manifesto featured on Wired and a series of design fictions in collaboration with well-known design studios in London and Shanghai.
Friday 19 June 2015
News
Unique 3D mouthpiece Benjamin Herman
Unique 3D mouthpiece Benjamin Herman
During the Day of Wonder has saxophonist Benjamin Herman played on a mouthpiece made on the 3D multi-material printer of IDE. It was custom printed by Jouke Verlinden and Zjenja Doubrovski. Herman was so satisfied that he only played with this special mouthpiece afterwards.
Sunday 14 June 2015
Events
IDEMC5: Human Factors, Comfort and Design
IDEMC5: Human Factors, Comfort and Design
Better performance by designing for the ideal ergonomic context 
Peter Vink, Professor Environmental Ergonomics, IDE TU Delft
Wednesday 28 September 2016
Events
IDEMC6: Design for Emotion and Happiness
IDEMC6: Design for Emotion and Happiness
Identifying and designing for enjoyable and meaningful experiences
Wednesday 12 October 2016
Case
Designing for Maintainance
Designing for Maintainance
What if a part breaks? This question is often overlooked when designing large machines or production lines. This is remarkable because maintenance and repairs can be costly – apart from the cost of a machine being out of order. It is therefore worthwhile to investigate whether smart design can facilitate quicker and cheaper maintenance. Smart design can be anything. Such as a simple piece of glass covering a drive belt, allowing immediate checking if the belt is broken. But also a complex monitoring system that gives a warning signal when parts are wearing, thus allowing a better planning of maintenance. Wienik Mulder made a overview of design rules that support the design or improvement of installations.
Case
What Do You Mean, 'Nice'?
What Do You Mean, 'Nice'?
“We say we are tired, moody or scared. When we talk about negative emotions we are very precise. With positive emotions, on the other hand, everything quickly becomes ‘nice’. Clients ask for a ‘nice’ design,” says Jay Yoon. But a designer does not know what to do with ‘nice’. He therefore designed a set of 25 cards with positive emotions. The cards facilitate the communication between designers and clients. What positive emotions does the client want, exactly? Designers can also use the cards for themselves. For example to find inspiration while creating a design that has to evoke one particular positive emotion.
“We are learning through experience, the app is still in development. Anybody can use IdAnimate for free, as long as we can see what they do with it. After all, we cannot predict what the user will use the program for, and how,” says Javier Quevedo Fernández.
Case
Subtle Technology
Subtle Technology
A ringing telephone, your computer screen – they are designed to claim your full attention. Saskia Bakker designed the operable lights called FireFlies in the context of her research into less intrusive, or “ambient”, technology. The lights have been tested in primary schools. The teacher can control them per child or for the whole group.
For example, while helping one child, the teacher can give a light signal to another child who has raised his or her finger, indicating that he will come over soon. Or the teacher can warn or praise a child while the class is quietly at work.
In her work Bakker uses psychological theories of attention. “I think designers should really consider how much attention their designs claim from the users.”

Publications

Design United

Latest updates

News
Shaking hands with the Future on BRIGHT TV
Shaking hands with the Future on BRIGHT TV
Last week BRIGHT TV filmed the project Shaking hands with the Future at the Social Robotics Lab in the A-Lab in Amsterdam. The project will also be exhibited at Mind the Step at the Dutch Design Week from 17 - 25 October.
Wednesday 16 September 2015
News
IoT Design Manifesto
IoT Design Manifesto
As our everyday becomes increasingly connected, the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering has taken on the challenge of how to design meaningfully and responsibly in a connected world. As opposed to merely looking at products in terms of efficiency or profit, IDE designers are trained to be sensitive to how products fit into our lives and society at large. And more and more, they are in a position to bring those considerations to bear on how a product is developed. This commitment to design for our future in the vast and unknown territory of the Internet of Things has already produced a Design Manifesto featured on Wired and a series of design fictions in collaboration with well-known design studios in London and Shanghai.
Friday 19 June 2015
News
Unique 3D mouthpiece Benjamin Herman
Unique 3D mouthpiece Benjamin Herman
During the Day of Wonder has saxophonist Benjamin Herman played on a mouthpiece made on the 3D multi-material printer of IDE. It was custom printed by Jouke Verlinden and Zjenja Doubrovski. Herman was so satisfied that he only played with this special mouthpiece afterwards.
Sunday 14 June 2015
Events
IDEMC5: Human Factors, Comfort and Design
IDEMC5: Human Factors, Comfort and Design
Better performance by designing for the ideal ergonomic context 
Peter Vink, Professor Environmental Ergonomics, IDE TU Delft
Wednesday 28 September 2016
Events
IDEMC6: Design for Emotion and Happiness
IDEMC6: Design for Emotion and Happiness
Identifying and designing for enjoyable and meaningful experiences
Wednesday 12 October 2016
Case
Designing for Maintainance
Designing for Maintainance
What if a part breaks? This question is often overlooked when designing large machines or production lines. This is remarkable because maintenance and repairs can be costly – apart from the cost of a machine being out of order. It is therefore worthwhile to investigate whether smart design can facilitate quicker and cheaper maintenance. Smart design can be anything. Such as a simple piece of glass covering a drive belt, allowing immediate checking if the belt is broken. But also a complex monitoring system that gives a warning signal when parts are wearing, thus allowing a better planning of maintenance. Wienik Mulder made a overview of design rules that support the design or improvement of installations.
Case
What Do You Mean, 'Nice'?
What Do You Mean, 'Nice'?
“We say we are tired, moody or scared. When we talk about negative emotions we are very precise. With positive emotions, on the other hand, everything quickly becomes ‘nice’. Clients ask for a ‘nice’ design,” says Jay Yoon. But a designer does not know what to do with ‘nice’. He therefore designed a set of 25 cards with positive emotions. The cards facilitate the communication between designers and clients. What positive emotions does the client want, exactly? Designers can also use the cards for themselves. For example to find inspiration while creating a design that has to evoke one particular positive emotion.
“We are learning through experience, the app is still in development. Anybody can use IdAnimate for free, as long as we can see what they do with it. After all, we cannot predict what the user will use the program for, and how,” says Javier Quevedo Fernández.
Case
Subtle Technology
Subtle Technology
A ringing telephone, your computer screen – they are designed to claim your full attention. Saskia Bakker designed the operable lights called FireFlies in the context of her research into less intrusive, or “ambient”, technology. The lights have been tested in primary schools. The teacher can control them per child or for the whole group.
For example, while helping one child, the teacher can give a light signal to another child who has raised his or her finger, indicating that he will come over soon. Or the teacher can warn or praise a child while the class is quietly at work.
In her work Bakker uses psychological theories of attention. “I think designers should really consider how much attention their designs claim from the users.”

Publications