Our mission

4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering brings the expertise of different scientists and engineers together to anticipate the grand challenges societies will be facing.
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Our mission is: bring scientist and engineers from different research areas together to develop, apply and disseminate knowledge, methods and tools for making the complex technological systems in societies more resilient.

Success depends on integrating different issues
‘We need to look at resilience engineering in two ways: first, how can we make the infrastructure itself resilient? Think, for example, of the cyber-resilience of new energy systems. Second, how can we ensure that those infrastructural systems contribute to the resilience of society? We must not make the mistake of thinking these are separate issues. Success depends on integration.’
Arnoud Molenaar, Chief Resilience Officer Rotterdam
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering

Inclusiveness as a starting point for resilience
‘My topmost concern with regard to resilience is that we take inclusiveness as a starting point. For example, building a new bridge across the Meuse River in Rotterdam may not be needed from the point of view of transport and traffic, but as a means of expanding the world of the 80,000 children living in southern Rotterdam, and exposing them to other parts of the city and access to broader experience, education and employment, it could be a crucial urban resilience measure. Also, I would like to add population ageing to the list of themes typically associated with resilience. Ageing over time will have a huge impact on societal resilience and how we develop it. We cannot afford to neglect it.’
Aernout van der Bend, Managing Director NGInfra
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering

Our mission is: bring scientist and engineers from different research areas together to develop, apply and disseminate knowledge, methods and tools for making the complex technological systems in societies more resilient.

Success depends on integrating different issues
‘We need to look at resilience engineering in two ways: first, how can we make the infrastructure itself resilient? Think, for example, of the cyber-resilience of new energy systems. Second, how can we ensure that those infrastructural systems contribute to the resilience of society? We must not make the mistake of thinking these are separate issues. Success depends on integration.’
Arnoud Molenaar, Chief Resilience Officer Rotterdam
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering

Inclusiveness as a starting point for resilience
‘My topmost concern with regard to resilience is that we take inclusiveness as a starting point. For example, building a new bridge across the Meuse River in Rotterdam may not be needed from the point of view of transport and traffic, but as a means of expanding the world of the 80,000 children living in southern Rotterdam, and exposing them to other parts of the city and access to broader experience, education and employment, it could be a crucial urban resilience measure. Also, I would like to add population ageing to the list of themes typically associated with resilience. Ageing over time will have a huge impact on societal resilience and how we develop it. We cannot afford to neglect it.’
Aernout van der Bend, Managing Director NGInfra
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering

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Our mission

Our mission is: bring scientist and engineers from different research areas together to develop, apply and disseminate knowledge, methods and tools for making the complex technological systems in societies more resilient.

Success depends on integrating different issues
‘We need to look at resilience engineering in two ways: first, how can we make the infrastructure itself resilient? Think, for example, of the cyber-resilience of new energy systems. Second, how can we ensure that those infrastructural systems contribute to the resilience of society? We must not make the mistake of thinking these are separate issues. Success depends on integration.’
Arnoud Molenaar, Chief Resilience Officer Rotterdam
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering

Inclusiveness as a starting point for resilience
‘My topmost concern with regard to resilience is that we take inclusiveness as a starting point. For example, building a new bridge across the Meuse River in Rotterdam may not be needed from the point of view of transport and traffic, but as a means of expanding the world of the 80,000 children living in southern Rotterdam, and exposing them to other parts of the city and access to broader experience, education and employment, it could be a crucial urban resilience measure. Also, I would like to add population ageing to the list of themes typically associated with resilience. Ageing over time will have a huge impact on societal resilience and how we develop it. We cannot afford to neglect it.’
Aernout van der Bend, Managing Director NGInfra
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering

Our mission is: bring scientist and engineers from different research areas together to develop, apply and disseminate knowledge, methods and tools for making the complex technological systems in societies more resilient.

Success depends on integrating different issues
‘We need to look at resilience engineering in two ways: first, how can we make the infrastructure itself resilient? Think, for example, of the cyber-resilience of new energy systems. Second, how can we ensure that those infrastructural systems contribute to the resilience of society? We must not make the mistake of thinking these are separate issues. Success depends on integration.’
Arnoud Molenaar, Chief Resilience Officer Rotterdam
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering

Inclusiveness as a starting point for resilience
‘My topmost concern with regard to resilience is that we take inclusiveness as a starting point. For example, building a new bridge across the Meuse River in Rotterdam may not be needed from the point of view of transport and traffic, but as a means of expanding the world of the 80,000 children living in southern Rotterdam, and exposing them to other parts of the city and access to broader experience, education and employment, it could be a crucial urban resilience measure. Also, I would like to add population ageing to the list of themes typically associated with resilience. Ageing over time will have a huge impact on societal resilience and how we develop it. We cannot afford to neglect it.’
Aernout van der Bend, Managing Director NGInfra
Strategic Advisory Board 4TU Centre for Resilience Engineering