Prof. James De Yoreo will be visiting TU/e, UTwente & TU Delft

In the first week of May 2018, James De Yoreo (professor Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington) will be visiting TU/e, UTwente and TU Delft, hosted by prof.dr. Nico Sommerdijk (TU/e).
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Visit by prof.dr. James De Yoreo

In the first week of May 2018, prof.dr. James De Yoreo, has visited TU/e, UTwente and TU Delft. He was hosted by prof.dr. Nico Sommerdijk, chair of the Materials and Interface group of the Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at Eindhoven University of Technology. De Yoreo is affiliate professor Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Washington and involved in the 4TU.HTM research project 'Understanding structure formation in hierarchical hybrid materials through in situ liquid phase microscopies (TU/e)' lead by Nico Sommerdijk and performed by dr. Mohammad Moradi. This research project is part of the 4TU.HTM research programme 'New Horizons in Designer Materials'. 

As a part of his visit, James De Yoreo has been giving lectures at Eindhoven University of Technology (Thursday 3 May 2018), University of Twente (Monday 30 April) and Delft University of Technology (Tuesday 1 May 2018). 

Title and abstract of the lecture can be read below. Also a short biography of De Yoreo can be found below. 




Agenda

Eindhoven University of Technology

Title: They call it "Free Energy". So, hey, why pay? 
Speaker: Prof.dr. James De Yoreo
When: Thursday 3 May 2018 - this event took place already 
Time: 12.30 hours (ST Colloquium) 
Where: TU/e, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Helix STC 001 (map)
Host: prof.dr. Nico Sommerdijk
Contact person: dr. Mohammad Moradi 
Info: ST Colloquium Prof.dr. Jim J. De Yoreo 


Prof. James J. De Yoreo mentioning a joint paper with prof. Nico Sommerdijk:
'Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM'
Nature Reviews. Materials, 1: 16035.

Delft University of Technology

Title: They call it "Free Energy". So, hey, why pay? 
Speaker: Prof.dr. James De Yoreo 
When: Tuesday 1 May 2018 - this event took place already 
Time: 2 PM (14.00 hours) 
Where: TU Delft, Facultyof EEMSC, Building 36, room K 
Host: dr. Ryoichi Ishihara 
Contact address: Secr-QE-EWI@tudelft.nl (Joyce van Velzen)


Prof. James J. De Yoreo and dr. Ryoichi Ishihara 

University of Twente

Title: They call it "Free Energy". So, hey, why pay? 
Speaker: Prof.dr. James De Yoreo 
When: Monday 30 April 2018 - this event took place already 
Time: 11 AM (11.00 hours) 
Where: UTwente, Building Carré, room 2H (map)
Hosts: prof.dr. J.J.L.M. Cornelissen & dr. J.M.J. Paulusse (Biomolecular NanoTechnology Group) 
Contact address: BNTtnw@utwente.nl (Nicole Haitjema) 

They Call It “Free Energy”
So, Hey, Why Pay?

Abstract

Nucleation is the seminal process in the formation of ordered structures ranging from simple inorganic crystals to macromolecular films. Recent observations have revealed a rich set of hierarchical pathways involving higher-order species ranging from multi-ion clusters to dense liquid droplets to transient amorphous or crystalline phases. Despite their complexity, a holistic framework for understanding such pathways based on classical concepts emerges when the effects of complexities in free energy landscapes and kinetic factors are considered. I illustrate that framework using in situ TEM and AFM studies of inorganic, organic, and macromolecular systems.  The results show that introduction of size-dependent phase stability or high driving force coupled with the existence of metastable polymorphs leads to true two-step pathways characterized by the initial appearance of a bulk precursor. Creation of micro-states representing local free energy minima stabilized by configurational factors also drives hierarchical pathways, but the intermediates can only exist as transient microscopic entities.  Small changes in molecular structure can eliminate these transients and lead to direct nucleation pathways.  In either case, reduction in molecular mobility can freeze in non-equilibrium states for kinetic reasons. The findings provide a common basis for understanding the development of order in diverse systems.

Biography

James J. De Yoreo is Chief Scientist for Materials Science at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Affiliate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Washington.

He received his PhD in Physics from Cornell University in 1985. Following post-doctoral work at Princeton, he became a member of the technical staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1989, where he held numerous positions including Deputy Director of the Laboratory Science and Technology Office. He joined Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 2007 where he was Interim Director of the Molecular Foundry before moving to PNNL in 2012. De Yoreo’s research spans a wide range of materials-related disciplines, focusing most recently on interactions, assembly, and crystallization in inorganic, biomolecular and biomineral systems.

De Yoreo has authored, co-authored, or edited over 225 publications and patents. He is a recipient of the David Turnbull Lectureship of the Materials Research Society (MRS), the Laudise Prize of the International Organization for Crystal Growth’s (IOCG), the Crystal Growth Award of the American Association for Crystal Growth (AACG), and an R&D 100 Award. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the MRS, a member of the IOCG Executive Committee, and served as MRS President.

Prof. James De Yoreo will be visiting TU/e, UTwente & TU Delft

Visit by prof.dr. James De Yoreo

In the first week of May 2018, prof.dr. James De Yoreo, has visited TU/e, UTwente and TU Delft. He was hosted by prof.dr. Nico Sommerdijk, chair of the Materials and Interface group of the Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at Eindhoven University of Technology. De Yoreo is affiliate professor Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Washington and involved in the 4TU.HTM research project 'Understanding structure formation in hierarchical hybrid materials through in situ liquid phase microscopies (TU/e)' lead by Nico Sommerdijk and performed by dr. Mohammad Moradi. This research project is part of the 4TU.HTM research programme 'New Horizons in Designer Materials'. 

As a part of his visit, James De Yoreo has been giving lectures at Eindhoven University of Technology (Thursday 3 May 2018), University of Twente (Monday 30 April) and Delft University of Technology (Tuesday 1 May 2018). 

Title and abstract of the lecture can be read below. Also a short biography of De Yoreo can be found below. 




Agenda

Eindhoven University of Technology

Title: They call it "Free Energy". So, hey, why pay? 
Speaker: Prof.dr. James De Yoreo
When: Thursday 3 May 2018 - this event took place already 
Time: 12.30 hours (ST Colloquium) 
Where: TU/e, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Helix STC 001 (map)
Host: prof.dr. Nico Sommerdijk
Contact person: dr. Mohammad Moradi 
Info: ST Colloquium Prof.dr. Jim J. De Yoreo 


Prof. James J. De Yoreo mentioning a joint paper with prof. Nico Sommerdijk:
'Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM'
Nature Reviews. Materials, 1: 16035.

Delft University of Technology

Title: They call it "Free Energy". So, hey, why pay? 
Speaker: Prof.dr. James De Yoreo 
When: Tuesday 1 May 2018 - this event took place already 
Time: 2 PM (14.00 hours) 
Where: TU Delft, Facultyof EEMSC, Building 36, room K 
Host: dr. Ryoichi Ishihara 
Contact address: Secr-QE-EWI@tudelft.nl (Joyce van Velzen)


Prof. James J. De Yoreo and dr. Ryoichi Ishihara 

University of Twente

Title: They call it "Free Energy". So, hey, why pay? 
Speaker: Prof.dr. James De Yoreo 
When: Monday 30 April 2018 - this event took place already 
Time: 11 AM (11.00 hours) 
Where: UTwente, Building Carré, room 2H (map)
Hosts: prof.dr. J.J.L.M. Cornelissen & dr. J.M.J. Paulusse (Biomolecular NanoTechnology Group) 
Contact address: BNTtnw@utwente.nl (Nicole Haitjema) 

They Call It “Free Energy”
So, Hey, Why Pay?

Abstract

Nucleation is the seminal process in the formation of ordered structures ranging from simple inorganic crystals to macromolecular films. Recent observations have revealed a rich set of hierarchical pathways involving higher-order species ranging from multi-ion clusters to dense liquid droplets to transient amorphous or crystalline phases. Despite their complexity, a holistic framework for understanding such pathways based on classical concepts emerges when the effects of complexities in free energy landscapes and kinetic factors are considered. I illustrate that framework using in situ TEM and AFM studies of inorganic, organic, and macromolecular systems.  The results show that introduction of size-dependent phase stability or high driving force coupled with the existence of metastable polymorphs leads to true two-step pathways characterized by the initial appearance of a bulk precursor. Creation of micro-states representing local free energy minima stabilized by configurational factors also drives hierarchical pathways, but the intermediates can only exist as transient microscopic entities.  Small changes in molecular structure can eliminate these transients and lead to direct nucleation pathways.  In either case, reduction in molecular mobility can freeze in non-equilibrium states for kinetic reasons. The findings provide a common basis for understanding the development of order in diverse systems.

Biography

James J. De Yoreo is Chief Scientist for Materials Science at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Affiliate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Washington.

He received his PhD in Physics from Cornell University in 1985. Following post-doctoral work at Princeton, he became a member of the technical staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1989, where he held numerous positions including Deputy Director of the Laboratory Science and Technology Office. He joined Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 2007 where he was Interim Director of the Molecular Foundry before moving to PNNL in 2012. De Yoreo’s research spans a wide range of materials-related disciplines, focusing most recently on interactions, assembly, and crystallization in inorganic, biomolecular and biomineral systems.

De Yoreo has authored, co-authored, or edited over 225 publications and patents. He is a recipient of the David Turnbull Lectureship of the Materials Research Society (MRS), the Laudise Prize of the International Organization for Crystal Growth’s (IOCG), the Crystal Growth Award of the American Association for Crystal Growth (AACG), and an R&D 100 Award. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the MRS, a member of the IOCG Executive Committee, and served as MRS President.