Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well (S4)

4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well (S4)

The research program "Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well" (S4) aims to combine knowledge available from different disciplines, such as computer science, psychology, and industrial design, to explore new collaborations and come to innovative developments that facilitate and support human values in an increasingly sociotechnical world.

Traditionally, the research discipline of human-technology interaction (HTI) brings together two important research areas. On the one hand, psychologists, ergonomists, usability engineers, philosophers, social science researchers, and other humanities researchers investigate how people work with technology, how they experience technology, and how technology impacts people and society. On the other hand, computer scientists, electro technicians, industrial designers, and other technical researchers investigate how to design and develop technology that supports or improves the human body and brain. These two pillars, social sciences and technical sciences, are both crucial to understanding HTI. It is impossible to come to a good design without knowing the possibilities and limitations of the human body and brain. Likewise, human-centred technology enables the humanities and social sciences to benefit from new possibilities to understand human behaviour, both at the individual and group level. Examples are: automated behaviour analysis, synthesis of human-like behaviour, measuring and observing human behaviour within a natural context or within an advanced simulated environment used to create an artificial, but believable, context.

Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well (S4)

The research program "Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well" (S4) aims to combine knowledge available from different disciplines, such as computer science, psychology, and industrial design, to explore new collaborations and come to innovative developments that facilitate and support human values in an increasingly sociotechnical world.

Traditionally, the research discipline of human-technology interaction (HTI) brings together two important research areas. On the one hand, psychologists, ergonomists, usability engineers, philosophers, social science researchers, and other humanities researchers investigate how people work with technology, how they experience technology, and how technology impacts people and society. On the other hand, computer scientists, electro technicians, industrial designers, and other technical researchers investigate how to design and develop technology that supports or improves the human body and brain. These two pillars, social sciences and technical sciences, are both crucial to understanding HTI. It is impossible to come to a good design without knowing the possibilities and limitations of the human body and brain. Likewise, human-centred technology enables the humanities and social sciences to benefit from new possibilities to understand human behaviour, both at the individual and group level. Examples are: automated behaviour analysis, synthesis of human-like behaviour, measuring and observing human behaviour within a natural context or within an advanced simulated environment used to create an artificial, but believable, context.

Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well (S4)

Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well (S4)

The research program "Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well" (S4) aims to combine knowledge available from different disciplines, such as computer science, psychology, and industrial design, to explore new collaborations and come to innovative developments that facilitate and support human values in an increasingly sociotechnical world.

Traditionally, the research discipline of human-technology interaction (HTI) brings together two important research areas. On the one hand, psychologists, ergonomists, usability engineers, philosophers, social science researchers, and other humanities researchers investigate how people work with technology, how they experience technology, and how technology impacts people and society. On the other hand, computer scientists, electro technicians, industrial designers, and other technical researchers investigate how to design and develop technology that supports or improves the human body and brain. These two pillars, social sciences and technical sciences, are both crucial to understanding HTI. It is impossible to come to a good design without knowing the possibilities and limitations of the human body and brain. Likewise, human-centred technology enables the humanities and social sciences to benefit from new possibilities to understand human behaviour, both at the individual and group level. Examples are: automated behaviour analysis, synthesis of human-like behaviour, measuring and observing human behaviour within a natural context or within an advanced simulated environment used to create an artificial, but believable, context.

Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well (S4)

The research program "Smart Social Systems and Spaces for Living Well" (S4) aims to combine knowledge available from different disciplines, such as computer science, psychology, and industrial design, to explore new collaborations and come to innovative developments that facilitate and support human values in an increasingly sociotechnical world.

Traditionally, the research discipline of human-technology interaction (HTI) brings together two important research areas. On the one hand, psychologists, ergonomists, usability engineers, philosophers, social science researchers, and other humanities researchers investigate how people work with technology, how they experience technology, and how technology impacts people and society. On the other hand, computer scientists, electro technicians, industrial designers, and other technical researchers investigate how to design and develop technology that supports or improves the human body and brain. These two pillars, social sciences and technical sciences, are both crucial to understanding HTI. It is impossible to come to a good design without knowing the possibilities and limitations of the human body and brain. Likewise, human-centred technology enables the humanities and social sciences to benefit from new possibilities to understand human behaviour, both at the individual and group level. Examples are: automated behaviour analysis, synthesis of human-like behaviour, measuring and observing human behaviour within a natural context or within an advanced simulated environment used to create an artificial, but believable, context.