4TU.H&T Symposium Machine Smarts and Human Values: designing a humanistic future

The 3TU research centre Humans & Technology (H&T) brings together the humanities and technical sciences. Its goal is excellent research on innovative forms of human-technology interaction for smart social systems and spaces.
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

4TU.H&T – TU/e Center for Humans & Technology Symposium on Machine Smarts & Human Values, 13-14 October 2016

On Thursday 13 and Friday 14 October, the symposium on Machine Smarts and Human Values took place at the Eindhoven University of Technology. The first day was organized specifically for PhD students from the 4 Universities and had the theme ‘Collaboration’. One of the core values of the 4TU consortium is to promote cooperation between research institutes. To this end, about 20 PhD students from different departments of the different Universities came together to find and discuss common interests. These discussions were triggered by a talk given by Dr. Daniel Lakens about the importance of collaboration in science, after which a speed dating session really brought the PhD’s closer together. During this session some very nice couples and groups were formed. Later that day they worked together developing collaborative proposals for combined research or follow-up events. The best ideas from those proposals were awarded and the next events are already being planned. In the end this day showed many PhD students that they have more in common than they think, opening up possibilities for collaborations between the Universities.

 

The second day of the symposium was open for anyone interested in the topic of Machine Smarts and Human Values. About 50 people from Universities and businesses across the country gathered for an interactive day highlighting one of the main challenges for Human-Technology Interaction: designing a future in which intelligent humans and smart machines can co-exist and thrive. The morning program focused on the philosophical and ethical consequences of smart machines with talks from Prof. Anthony Meijers and Maurits Martijn. The discussion session was centered on what is needed from smart machines and from us to respect our human values such as agency, personal identity, privacy, autonomy, and responsibility. The afternoon session focused on a design approach with talks from Prof. Paul Hekkert and Dr. Matthias Laschke. The discussion that followed their talks had a strong focus on what we can do in the design of technology that influences our lives in unprecedented ways while keeping a deep appreciation of human nature and context at all levels – physical, psychological, organizational, and societal. With plenty of room for mingling, the discussions were not bound to the fixed sessions, but continued during drinks at the end of the program.

 


4TU.H&T Symposium Machine Smarts and Human Values: designing a humanistic future

4TU.H&T – TU/e Center for Humans & Technology Symposium on Machine Smarts & Human Values, 13-14 October 2016

On Thursday 13 and Friday 14 October, the symposium on Machine Smarts and Human Values took place at the Eindhoven University of Technology. The first day was organized specifically for PhD students from the 4 Universities and had the theme ‘Collaboration’. One of the core values of the 4TU consortium is to promote cooperation between research institutes. To this end, about 20 PhD students from different departments of the different Universities came together to find and discuss common interests. These discussions were triggered by a talk given by Dr. Daniel Lakens about the importance of collaboration in science, after which a speed dating session really brought the PhD’s closer together. During this session some very nice couples and groups were formed. Later that day they worked together developing collaborative proposals for combined research or follow-up events. The best ideas from those proposals were awarded and the next events are already being planned. In the end this day showed many PhD students that they have more in common than they think, opening up possibilities for collaborations between the Universities.

 

The second day of the symposium was open for anyone interested in the topic of Machine Smarts and Human Values. About 50 people from Universities and businesses across the country gathered for an interactive day highlighting one of the main challenges for Human-Technology Interaction: designing a future in which intelligent humans and smart machines can co-exist and thrive. The morning program focused on the philosophical and ethical consequences of smart machines with talks from Prof. Anthony Meijers and Maurits Martijn. The discussion session was centered on what is needed from smart machines and from us to respect our human values such as agency, personal identity, privacy, autonomy, and responsibility. The afternoon session focused on a design approach with talks from Prof. Paul Hekkert and Dr. Matthias Laschke. The discussion that followed their talks had a strong focus on what we can do in the design of technology that influences our lives in unprecedented ways while keeping a deep appreciation of human nature and context at all levels – physical, psychological, organizational, and societal. With plenty of room for mingling, the discussions were not bound to the fixed sessions, but continued during drinks at the end of the program.