Winterschool on Affective Computing and Social Signal Processing 2018

4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Winterschool on Affective Computing and Social Signal Processing 2018

In total, 26 students from EU including Italy, France, and the Netherlands attended the winterschool. As lecturers, Joost Broekens (TUD, Delft), Jon Gratch (ICT, LA), Dirk Heylen (UT, Enschede), Hayley Hung (TUD, Delft), Gary McKeown (QUB, Belfast), Merijn Bruijnes, (UT, Enschede), Bjorn Schuller (UNIA, Augsburg) and Mohamed Chetouani (SU, Paris) gave talks on different topics within affective computing and social signal processing.


Throughout 5 days, there were lectures from experts in the field, doctoral consulting sessions, and collaborative working sessions where students worked on different research aspects within the focus of an “emotional coping device”. The goals of this winterschool were to learn from each other, to work in groups on shared research questions, and to have as an outcome written whitepapers with a research agenda.

On the first day, this collaborative part of the winterschool was kicked-off with a brainstorming session around challenges in and for affective computing and social signal processing. 4 groups were then formed to work on the following shared topics:

  • Requirements and evaluation of effects and effectiveness of an Emotional Coping Device
  • Diversity issues in an Emotional Coping Device (Context/Variation/Person/Generic/Specific Models)
  • Time, Segmentation, and Multimodality of signals in an Emotional Coping Device
  • Learning and adaptation of models in an Emotional Coping Device


Throughout the remaining  days of the winterschool groups worked intensively on developing their assigned topics into concrete research plans. An important part of this process were the daily plenary presentations. Here work groups could present the current status of their project to the lecturers as well as their peers in other project groups, allowing them to gain feedback and to share open questions or challenges with each other.  

Of course, some social events kept the students (and lecturers) fresh and awake. There were walks in the dunes and drinks & games in the evenings!


Winterschool on Affective Computing and Social Signal Processing 2018

Winterschool on Affective Computing and Social Signal Processing 2018

In total, 26 students from EU including Italy, France, and the Netherlands attended the winterschool. As lecturers, Joost Broekens (TUD, Delft), Jon Gratch (ICT, LA), Dirk Heylen (UT, Enschede), Hayley Hung (TUD, Delft), Gary McKeown (QUB, Belfast), Merijn Bruijnes, (UT, Enschede), Bjorn Schuller (UNIA, Augsburg) and Mohamed Chetouani (SU, Paris) gave talks on different topics within affective computing and social signal processing.


Throughout 5 days, there were lectures from experts in the field, doctoral consulting sessions, and collaborative working sessions where students worked on different research aspects within the focus of an “emotional coping device”. The goals of this winterschool were to learn from each other, to work in groups on shared research questions, and to have as an outcome written whitepapers with a research agenda.

On the first day, this collaborative part of the winterschool was kicked-off with a brainstorming session around challenges in and for affective computing and social signal processing. 4 groups were then formed to work on the following shared topics:

  • Requirements and evaluation of effects and effectiveness of an Emotional Coping Device
  • Diversity issues in an Emotional Coping Device (Context/Variation/Person/Generic/Specific Models)
  • Time, Segmentation, and Multimodality of signals in an Emotional Coping Device
  • Learning and adaptation of models in an Emotional Coping Device


Throughout the remaining  days of the winterschool groups worked intensively on developing their assigned topics into concrete research plans. An important part of this process were the daily plenary presentations. Here work groups could present the current status of their project to the lecturers as well as their peers in other project groups, allowing them to gain feedback and to share open questions or challenges with each other.  

Of course, some social events kept the students (and lecturers) fresh and awake. There were walks in the dunes and drinks & games in the evenings!