Research meet: Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behaviour Change

Technology is seen to help countless people in many ways, but does it actually help people become fitter, happier or more productive? The road to a healthier life can be interpreted in more than one way and sometimes with unforeseen contingencies when technology is involved. The research meet "Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change" that took place on September 25th at TU Eindhoven addressed this topic.

Maurits Kaptein, the first speaker, discussed how personalization via computational techniques can make behavior change happen in a socially and ethically good manner. Regarding research by Panos Markopoulos, Maurits comments that “it was very cool to see the in-field work he is doing and some of the ways they are using persuasion profiling in applied projects”, such as correcting nurses’ postures via wearable technology to reduce work-related lower back pain. Philip Nickel of Philosophy and Ethics at TU Eindhoven discussed how e-coaching can be excellent and Joyca Lacroix tied together how trust, consent, and intrinsic motivation when it comes to offering behavior change solutions. 

Six PhD students presented pitches about their research touching on topics such as self-tracking, psychophysiology, trust, robots for persuasive technology, and human vulnerability. There are many debates to be had on these topics as technology attempts to influence human behavior, and we hope that the research meet planted the seed of many future collaborations to come. In sum, presenters offered a “critical but hopeful insights on the future of self-tracking devices”, according to Sima Ipakchian Askari, an attendee and a PhD student in the Human-Technology Interaction group at TU Eindhoven. The entire program can be found here.

Research meet: Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behaviour Change

Technology is seen to help countless people in many ways, but does it actually help people become fitter, happier or more productive? The road to a healthier life can be interpreted in more than one way and sometimes with unforeseen contingencies when technology is involved. The research meet "Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change" that took place on September 25th at TU Eindhoven addressed this topic.

Maurits Kaptein, the first speaker, discussed how personalization via computational techniques can make behavior change happen in a socially and ethically good manner. Regarding research by Panos Markopoulos, Maurits comments that “it was very cool to see the in-field work he is doing and some of the ways they are using persuasion profiling in applied projects”, such as correcting nurses’ postures via wearable technology to reduce work-related lower back pain. Philip Nickel of Philosophy and Ethics at TU Eindhoven discussed how e-coaching can be excellent and Joyca Lacroix tied together how trust, consent, and intrinsic motivation when it comes to offering behavior change solutions. 

Six PhD students presented pitches about their research touching on topics such as self-tracking, psychophysiology, trust, robots for persuasive technology, and human vulnerability. There are many debates to be had on these topics as technology attempts to influence human behavior, and we hope that the research meet planted the seed of many future collaborations to come. In sum, presenters offered a “critical but hopeful insights on the future of self-tracking devices”, according to Sima Ipakchian Askari, an attendee and a PhD student in the Human-Technology Interaction group at TU Eindhoven. The entire program can be found here.