Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

25 September 2017
13:00 - 17:30
‘Zwarte Doos’ at TU/e campus
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

Technology aimed at changing our behavior is everywhere. Just look around. Speed bumps and special signs in the streets try to make us drive more careful. Fitness apps aim to make us exercise more. Fake flies in men’s urinals to keep public toilets cleaner. Netflix recommendations try to persuade us to watch more programs. Seat-belt reminders stimulate us to buckle up. And software tries to prevent RSI with office workers. 

In an era of Quantified Self, big data and Internet-of-Things, the reach and impact of technology on our lives is increasing exponentially. There is great promise in technologies that aim to change behaviors - technologies that help us to break bad habits, enhance our self-awareness, and help us lead lives that are healthier and safer, more productive, and, presumably, happier. However, visions of self-improvement and progress are also clouded by some nagging doubts about the world we are creating. The 1997 Radiohead song, referred to in the title of this event,  already contains a veiled criticism of an overregulated life. There’s a fear that as personalized, user-sensitive technologies entangle with everyday life, we are pressed into a mold of model citizens living bland, data-driven lives, based on a rational collectivist notion of health, happiness and productivity. Is this the future we are designing for ourselves? Is this the future we want to live in?

Programme


TALKS (Part 1)

1.       Computational personalization for behavior change
Maurits Kaptein, Data Science & Health, JADS, Den Bosch / Research methods and statistics, Tilburg University

2.       To be announced
Panos Markopoulos, User Centered Engineering, Industrial Design, TU Eindhoven

PITCHES

·         Quantified Self and Habit Formation
Elçin Hanci, PhD Candidate Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         From self-tracking to self-improvement: mind the gap!
Els Kersten – van Dijk, PhD Candidate, Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         Persuading the Vulnerable
Naomi Jacobs, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

·         The psychophysiology of persuasion
Hanne Spelt, PhD Candidate, Philips Research

·         How to Design a Robot that You Comply With and Trust?
Aimi Shazwani Ghazali, PhD Candidate Industrial Design (TU/e)

·         Rethinking trust and consent in mobile behavior change support systems
Iris Loosman, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

TALKS (Part 2)

3.       The excellence of e-coaching
Philip J. Nickel, Philosophy & Ethics, TU/e

4.       The future of digital behavior change solutions: the relevance of trust, consent and intrinsic motivation
Joyca Lacroix, Senior Scientist, Philips Research

Venue

The Research Meet  "Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change" will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the ‘Zwarte Doos’ building.

Who?

Researchers of TU/e and partners of the Center for Humans and Technology, including 4TU and the Vitality Academy

Registration

We advise you to reserve your seat now!

Organizer

Prof. dr. Wijnand IJsselsteijn, W.A.IJsselsteijn@tue.nl , Eindhoven University of Technology

Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

Technology aimed at changing our behavior is everywhere. Just look around. Speed bumps and special signs in the streets try to make us drive more careful. Fitness apps aim to make us exercise more. Fake flies in men’s urinals to keep public toilets cleaner. Netflix recommendations try to persuade us to watch more programs. Seat-belt reminders stimulate us to buckle up. And software tries to prevent RSI with office workers. 

In an era of Quantified Self, big data and Internet-of-Things, the reach and impact of technology on our lives is increasing exponentially. There is great promise in technologies that aim to change behaviors - technologies that help us to break bad habits, enhance our self-awareness, and help us lead lives that are healthier and safer, more productive, and, presumably, happier. However, visions of self-improvement and progress are also clouded by some nagging doubts about the world we are creating. The 1997 Radiohead song, referred to in the title of this event,  already contains a veiled criticism of an overregulated life. There’s a fear that as personalized, user-sensitive technologies entangle with everyday life, we are pressed into a mold of model citizens living bland, data-driven lives, based on a rational collectivist notion of health, happiness and productivity. Is this the future we are designing for ourselves? Is this the future we want to live in?

Programme


TALKS (Part 1)

1.       Computational personalization for behavior change
Maurits Kaptein, Data Science & Health, JADS, Den Bosch / Research methods and statistics, Tilburg University

2.       To be announced
Panos Markopoulos, User Centered Engineering, Industrial Design, TU Eindhoven

PITCHES

·         Quantified Self and Habit Formation
Elçin Hanci, PhD Candidate Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         From self-tracking to self-improvement: mind the gap!
Els Kersten – van Dijk, PhD Candidate, Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         Persuading the Vulnerable
Naomi Jacobs, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

·         The psychophysiology of persuasion
Hanne Spelt, PhD Candidate, Philips Research

·         How to Design a Robot that You Comply With and Trust?
Aimi Shazwani Ghazali, PhD Candidate Industrial Design (TU/e)

·         Rethinking trust and consent in mobile behavior change support systems
Iris Loosman, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

TALKS (Part 2)

3.       The excellence of e-coaching
Philip J. Nickel, Philosophy & Ethics, TU/e

4.       The future of digital behavior change solutions: the relevance of trust, consent and intrinsic motivation
Joyca Lacroix, Senior Scientist, Philips Research

Venue

The Research Meet  "Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change" will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the ‘Zwarte Doos’ building.

Who?

Researchers of TU/e and partners of the Center for Humans and Technology, including 4TU and the Vitality Academy

Registration

We advise you to reserve your seat now!

Organizer

Prof. dr. Wijnand IJsselsteijn, W.A.IJsselsteijn@tue.nl , Eindhoven University of Technology

Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

25 September 2017
13:00 - 17:30
‘Zwarte Doos’ at TU/e campus

Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

Technology aimed at changing our behavior is everywhere. Just look around. Speed bumps and special signs in the streets try to make us drive more careful. Fitness apps aim to make us exercise more. Fake flies in men’s urinals to keep public toilets cleaner. Netflix recommendations try to persuade us to watch more programs. Seat-belt reminders stimulate us to buckle up. And software tries to prevent RSI with office workers. 

In an era of Quantified Self, big data and Internet-of-Things, the reach and impact of technology on our lives is increasing exponentially. There is great promise in technologies that aim to change behaviors - technologies that help us to break bad habits, enhance our self-awareness, and help us lead lives that are healthier and safer, more productive, and, presumably, happier. However, visions of self-improvement and progress are also clouded by some nagging doubts about the world we are creating. The 1997 Radiohead song, referred to in the title of this event,  already contains a veiled criticism of an overregulated life. There’s a fear that as personalized, user-sensitive technologies entangle with everyday life, we are pressed into a mold of model citizens living bland, data-driven lives, based on a rational collectivist notion of health, happiness and productivity. Is this the future we are designing for ourselves? Is this the future we want to live in?

Programme


TALKS (Part 1)

1.       Computational personalization for behavior change
Maurits Kaptein, Data Science & Health, JADS, Den Bosch / Research methods and statistics, Tilburg University

2.       To be announced
Panos Markopoulos, User Centered Engineering, Industrial Design, TU Eindhoven

PITCHES

·         Quantified Self and Habit Formation
Elçin Hanci, PhD Candidate Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         From self-tracking to self-improvement: mind the gap!
Els Kersten – van Dijk, PhD Candidate, Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         Persuading the Vulnerable
Naomi Jacobs, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

·         The psychophysiology of persuasion
Hanne Spelt, PhD Candidate, Philips Research

·         How to Design a Robot that You Comply With and Trust?
Aimi Shazwani Ghazali, PhD Candidate Industrial Design (TU/e)

·         Rethinking trust and consent in mobile behavior change support systems
Iris Loosman, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

TALKS (Part 2)

3.       The excellence of e-coaching
Philip J. Nickel, Philosophy & Ethics, TU/e

4.       The future of digital behavior change solutions: the relevance of trust, consent and intrinsic motivation
Joyca Lacroix, Senior Scientist, Philips Research

Venue

The Research Meet  "Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change" will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the ‘Zwarte Doos’ building.

Who?

Researchers of TU/e and partners of the Center for Humans and Technology, including 4TU and the Vitality Academy

Registration

We advise you to reserve your seat now!

Organizer

Prof. dr. Wijnand IJsselsteijn, W.A.IJsselsteijn@tue.nl , Eindhoven University of Technology

Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change

Technology aimed at changing our behavior is everywhere. Just look around. Speed bumps and special signs in the streets try to make us drive more careful. Fitness apps aim to make us exercise more. Fake flies in men’s urinals to keep public toilets cleaner. Netflix recommendations try to persuade us to watch more programs. Seat-belt reminders stimulate us to buckle up. And software tries to prevent RSI with office workers. 

In an era of Quantified Self, big data and Internet-of-Things, the reach and impact of technology on our lives is increasing exponentially. There is great promise in technologies that aim to change behaviors - technologies that help us to break bad habits, enhance our self-awareness, and help us lead lives that are healthier and safer, more productive, and, presumably, happier. However, visions of self-improvement and progress are also clouded by some nagging doubts about the world we are creating. The 1997 Radiohead song, referred to in the title of this event,  already contains a veiled criticism of an overregulated life. There’s a fear that as personalized, user-sensitive technologies entangle with everyday life, we are pressed into a mold of model citizens living bland, data-driven lives, based on a rational collectivist notion of health, happiness and productivity. Is this the future we are designing for ourselves? Is this the future we want to live in?

Programme


TALKS (Part 1)

1.       Computational personalization for behavior change
Maurits Kaptein, Data Science & Health, JADS, Den Bosch / Research methods and statistics, Tilburg University

2.       To be announced
Panos Markopoulos, User Centered Engineering, Industrial Design, TU Eindhoven

PITCHES

·         Quantified Self and Habit Formation
Elçin Hanci, PhD Candidate Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         From self-tracking to self-improvement: mind the gap!
Els Kersten – van Dijk, PhD Candidate, Human Technology Interaction (TU/e)

·         Persuading the Vulnerable
Naomi Jacobs, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

·         The psychophysiology of persuasion
Hanne Spelt, PhD Candidate, Philips Research

·         How to Design a Robot that You Comply With and Trust?
Aimi Shazwani Ghazali, PhD Candidate Industrial Design (TU/e)

·         Rethinking trust and consent in mobile behavior change support systems
Iris Loosman, PhD Candidate Philisophy and Ethics (TU/e)

TALKS (Part 2)

3.       The excellence of e-coaching
Philip J. Nickel, Philosophy & Ethics, TU/e

4.       The future of digital behavior change solutions: the relevance of trust, consent and intrinsic motivation
Joyca Lacroix, Senior Scientist, Philips Research

Venue

The Research Meet  "Fitter, happier, more productive? The Science and Technology of Behavior Change" will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the ‘Zwarte Doos’ building.

Who?

Researchers of TU/e and partners of the Center for Humans and Technology, including 4TU and the Vitality Academy

Registration

We advise you to reserve your seat now!

Organizer

Prof. dr. Wijnand IJsselsteijn, W.A.IJsselsteijn@tue.nl , Eindhoven University of Technology