PhD defense Minha Lee

16 February 2021
16:00
Online
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen
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PhD defense Minha Lee

We are very proud to announce that our first PhD-student within the Humans & Technology Center will graduate. On February 16th 2021, Minha Lee will defend her thesis on interactional morality. The title of her thesis is called: ‘Interactional Morality: Technology as Our Moral Mirror’

As an introduction in her thesis you can read:

‘’MINHA LEE was born in Seoul, Korea. Her first research was on the puzzling phenomenon called “why rockos eat no chipos?” She has since then moved on to investigate how technology shapes us as moral beings, and whether our interactions with digital entities reveal our moral selves in a new light.’’

Minha Lee’s thesis provides an in-depth empirical exploration of the role that social digital agents, such as chatbots and humanoid robots, can play in shaping us as moral beings. The thesis sheds light on the ways in which social digital agents provide a lens to reassess human morality as embodied in artificially intelligent systems, as well as transformed through our interactions with such systems. Through morally relevant interactions in human-machine dyads – i.e., interactional morality – humans may stand to benefit in unexpected ways. For example, through extending kindness to a chatbot in need, we may start to feel more compassionate about ourselves as well. The thesis combines perspectives from HCI, moral philosophy, moral psychology, and speculative design.  The full dissertation can be found here: https://minha-lee.github.io/files/mlee_dissertation2021.pdf

PhD defense Minha Lee

We are very proud to announce that our first PhD-student within the Humans & Technology Center will graduate. On February 16th 2021, Minha Lee will defend her thesis on interactional morality. The title of her thesis is called: ‘Interactional Morality: Technology as Our Moral Mirror’

As an introduction in her thesis you can read:

‘’MINHA LEE was born in Seoul, Korea. Her first research was on the puzzling phenomenon called “why rockos eat no chipos?” She has since then moved on to investigate how technology shapes us as moral beings, and whether our interactions with digital entities reveal our moral selves in a new light.’’

Minha Lee’s thesis provides an in-depth empirical exploration of the role that social digital agents, such as chatbots and humanoid robots, can play in shaping us as moral beings. The thesis sheds light on the ways in which social digital agents provide a lens to reassess human morality as embodied in artificially intelligent systems, as well as transformed through our interactions with such systems. Through morally relevant interactions in human-machine dyads – i.e., interactional morality – humans may stand to benefit in unexpected ways. For example, through extending kindness to a chatbot in need, we may start to feel more compassionate about ourselves as well. The thesis combines perspectives from HCI, moral philosophy, moral psychology, and speculative design.  The full dissertation can be found here: https://minha-lee.github.io/files/mlee_dissertation2021.pdf

PhD defense Minha Lee

16 February 2021
16:00
Online

PhD defense Minha Lee

We are very proud to announce that our first PhD-student within the Humans & Technology Center will graduate. On February 16th 2021, Minha Lee will defend her thesis on interactional morality. The title of her thesis is called: ‘Interactional Morality: Technology as Our Moral Mirror’

As an introduction in her thesis you can read:

‘’MINHA LEE was born in Seoul, Korea. Her first research was on the puzzling phenomenon called “why rockos eat no chipos?” She has since then moved on to investigate how technology shapes us as moral beings, and whether our interactions with digital entities reveal our moral selves in a new light.’’

Minha Lee’s thesis provides an in-depth empirical exploration of the role that social digital agents, such as chatbots and humanoid robots, can play in shaping us as moral beings. The thesis sheds light on the ways in which social digital agents provide a lens to reassess human morality as embodied in artificially intelligent systems, as well as transformed through our interactions with such systems. Through morally relevant interactions in human-machine dyads – i.e., interactional morality – humans may stand to benefit in unexpected ways. For example, through extending kindness to a chatbot in need, we may start to feel more compassionate about ourselves as well. The thesis combines perspectives from HCI, moral philosophy, moral psychology, and speculative design.  The full dissertation can be found here: https://minha-lee.github.io/files/mlee_dissertation2021.pdf

PhD defense Minha Lee

We are very proud to announce that our first PhD-student within the Humans & Technology Center will graduate. On February 16th 2021, Minha Lee will defend her thesis on interactional morality. The title of her thesis is called: ‘Interactional Morality: Technology as Our Moral Mirror’

As an introduction in her thesis you can read:

‘’MINHA LEE was born in Seoul, Korea. Her first research was on the puzzling phenomenon called “why rockos eat no chipos?” She has since then moved on to investigate how technology shapes us as moral beings, and whether our interactions with digital entities reveal our moral selves in a new light.’’

Minha Lee’s thesis provides an in-depth empirical exploration of the role that social digital agents, such as chatbots and humanoid robots, can play in shaping us as moral beings. The thesis sheds light on the ways in which social digital agents provide a lens to reassess human morality as embodied in artificially intelligent systems, as well as transformed through our interactions with such systems. Through morally relevant interactions in human-machine dyads – i.e., interactional morality – humans may stand to benefit in unexpected ways. For example, through extending kindness to a chatbot in need, we may start to feel more compassionate about ourselves as well. The thesis combines perspectives from HCI, moral philosophy, moral psychology, and speculative design.  The full dissertation can be found here: https://minha-lee.github.io/files/mlee_dissertation2021.pdf