Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling

11 September 2017
09:30 - 17:00
TU/e Campus IPO building 0.26
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Registration is now open for the Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling, that is being organised by the TU/e Center for Humans & Technology and 4TU

Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling by Paul Smaldino

Students will learn about agent-based modeling and how it is applied to study social phenomena in human and animal societies. Agent-based models are widely used to help us understand a wide range of topics, including but not limited to  cooperation, social learning, collective problem solving, opinion dynamics and polarization, segregation, the spread of disease, and the emergence of social norms. In this one-day workshop, students will receive an introduction to the philosophy of modeling and to some key models in the life and social sciences, and get hands on experience writing and analyzing simulation models using NetLogo, a widely used software package for agent-based modeling.

All students should bring a laptop computer. Before the workshop begins, you should download andinstall NetLogo, a free software tool for running and visualizing agent-based simulations. Available here

You will also benefit substantially by going through Tutorials #1-3 in the NetLogo User’s Manual before the start of the workshop—this is strongly recommended. Going through all three tutorials will probably take you a couple of hours. The manual is bundled with the NetLogo download but also available separately here

Preliminary program

10:00am – 11:00am Act I, in which we are introduced to models, and to each other.

11:00am – 12:30pm Act II, in which we are introduced to NetLogo.

12:30pm – 1:30pm Intermission, in which we are fed and exchange pleasantries.

1:30pm – 2:00pm Act III, in which we are treated to a guest lecture by Julia Eberlen.

2:00pm – 4:00pm Act IV, in which we design, build, and analyze a simple model of diffusion.

4:00pm – 5:00pm Act V, in which we discuss model assumptions, the relationship between modeling and empirical data, and the primacy of theory.

Venue

The Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the IPO building, 0.26.

Registration

Participation is free, but registration is required, and covers lunch and coffee breaks at the event.

Please register by September 4th using this link

Organizer

Dr. Daniël Lakens, d.lakens@tue.nl, Eindhoven University of Technology

Suggested readings

Though not required, the following recommended readings provide helpful introductions to models and modeling.

• Smaldino PE (2017) Models are stupid, and we need more of them. In: RR Vallacher, ANowak, SJ Read (eds), Computational models in social psychology (pp 311–331). Psychology Press. Download here

• Smaldino PE, Calanchini J, Pickett CL (2015) Theory development with agent-based models. Organizational Psychology Review 5(4): 300–317. Download here

• Epstein JM (1999) Agent-based computational models and generative social science. Complexity 4(5): 41–60.  Download here

• Eberlen J, Scholz G, Gagliolo M (2017) Simulate this! An introduction to agent-based models and their power to improve your research practice. International Review of Social Psychology 30(1): 149–160.  Download here

• Wang XF, Chen G (2003) Complex networks: Small-world, scale-free and beyond. IEEE Circuits and Systems Magazine 3(1): 6–20.  Download here

• Grimm V, et al. (2005) Pattern-oriented modeling of agent-based complex systems: Lessons from ecology. Science 310: 987–991.  Download here

Registration is now open for the Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling, that is being organised by the TU/e Center for Humans & Technology and 4TU

Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling by Paul Smaldino

Students will learn about agent-based modeling and how it is applied to study social phenomena in human and animal societies. Agent-based models are widely used to help us understand a wide range of topics, including but not limited to  cooperation, social learning, collective problem solving, opinion dynamics and polarization, segregation, the spread of disease, and the emergence of social norms. In this one-day workshop, students will receive an introduction to the philosophy of modeling and to some key models in the life and social sciences, and get hands on experience writing and analyzing simulation models using NetLogo, a widely used software package for agent-based modeling.

All students should bring a laptop computer. Before the workshop begins, you should download andinstall NetLogo, a free software tool for running and visualizing agent-based simulations. Available here

You will also benefit substantially by going through Tutorials #1-3 in the NetLogo User’s Manual before the start of the workshop—this is strongly recommended. Going through all three tutorials will probably take you a couple of hours. The manual is bundled with the NetLogo download but also available separately here

Preliminary program

10:00am – 11:00am Act I, in which we are introduced to models, and to each other.

11:00am – 12:30pm Act II, in which we are introduced to NetLogo.

12:30pm – 1:30pm Intermission, in which we are fed and exchange pleasantries.

1:30pm – 2:00pm Act III, in which we are treated to a guest lecture by Julia Eberlen.

2:00pm – 4:00pm Act IV, in which we design, build, and analyze a simple model of diffusion.

4:00pm – 5:00pm Act V, in which we discuss model assumptions, the relationship between modeling and empirical data, and the primacy of theory.

Venue

The Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the IPO building, 0.26.

Registration

Participation is free, but registration is required, and covers lunch and coffee breaks at the event.

Please register by September 4th using this link

Organizer

Dr. Daniël Lakens, d.lakens@tue.nl, Eindhoven University of Technology

Suggested readings

Though not required, the following recommended readings provide helpful introductions to models and modeling.

• Smaldino PE (2017) Models are stupid, and we need more of them. In: RR Vallacher, ANowak, SJ Read (eds), Computational models in social psychology (pp 311–331). Psychology Press. Download here

• Smaldino PE, Calanchini J, Pickett CL (2015) Theory development with agent-based models. Organizational Psychology Review 5(4): 300–317. Download here

• Epstein JM (1999) Agent-based computational models and generative social science. Complexity 4(5): 41–60.  Download here

• Eberlen J, Scholz G, Gagliolo M (2017) Simulate this! An introduction to agent-based models and their power to improve your research practice. International Review of Social Psychology 30(1): 149–160.  Download here

• Wang XF, Chen G (2003) Complex networks: Small-world, scale-free and beyond. IEEE Circuits and Systems Magazine 3(1): 6–20.  Download here

• Grimm V, et al. (2005) Pattern-oriented modeling of agent-based complex systems: Lessons from ecology. Science 310: 987–991.  Download here

Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling

11 September 2017
09:30 - 17:00
TU/e Campus IPO building 0.26

Registration is now open for the Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling, that is being organised by the TU/e Center for Humans & Technology and 4TU

Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling by Paul Smaldino

Students will learn about agent-based modeling and how it is applied to study social phenomena in human and animal societies. Agent-based models are widely used to help us understand a wide range of topics, including but not limited to  cooperation, social learning, collective problem solving, opinion dynamics and polarization, segregation, the spread of disease, and the emergence of social norms. In this one-day workshop, students will receive an introduction to the philosophy of modeling and to some key models in the life and social sciences, and get hands on experience writing and analyzing simulation models using NetLogo, a widely used software package for agent-based modeling.

All students should bring a laptop computer. Before the workshop begins, you should download andinstall NetLogo, a free software tool for running and visualizing agent-based simulations. Available here

You will also benefit substantially by going through Tutorials #1-3 in the NetLogo User’s Manual before the start of the workshop—this is strongly recommended. Going through all three tutorials will probably take you a couple of hours. The manual is bundled with the NetLogo download but also available separately here

Preliminary program

10:00am – 11:00am Act I, in which we are introduced to models, and to each other.

11:00am – 12:30pm Act II, in which we are introduced to NetLogo.

12:30pm – 1:30pm Intermission, in which we are fed and exchange pleasantries.

1:30pm – 2:00pm Act III, in which we are treated to a guest lecture by Julia Eberlen.

2:00pm – 4:00pm Act IV, in which we design, build, and analyze a simple model of diffusion.

4:00pm – 5:00pm Act V, in which we discuss model assumptions, the relationship between modeling and empirical data, and the primacy of theory.

Venue

The Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the IPO building, 0.26.

Registration

Participation is free, but registration is required, and covers lunch and coffee breaks at the event.

Please register by September 4th using this link

Organizer

Dr. Daniël Lakens, d.lakens@tue.nl, Eindhoven University of Technology

Suggested readings

Though not required, the following recommended readings provide helpful introductions to models and modeling.

• Smaldino PE (2017) Models are stupid, and we need more of them. In: RR Vallacher, ANowak, SJ Read (eds), Computational models in social psychology (pp 311–331). Psychology Press. Download here

• Smaldino PE, Calanchini J, Pickett CL (2015) Theory development with agent-based models. Organizational Psychology Review 5(4): 300–317. Download here

• Epstein JM (1999) Agent-based computational models and generative social science. Complexity 4(5): 41–60.  Download here

• Eberlen J, Scholz G, Gagliolo M (2017) Simulate this! An introduction to agent-based models and their power to improve your research practice. International Review of Social Psychology 30(1): 149–160.  Download here

• Wang XF, Chen G (2003) Complex networks: Small-world, scale-free and beyond. IEEE Circuits and Systems Magazine 3(1): 6–20.  Download here

• Grimm V, et al. (2005) Pattern-oriented modeling of agent-based complex systems: Lessons from ecology. Science 310: 987–991.  Download here

Registration is now open for the Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling, that is being organised by the TU/e Center for Humans & Technology and 4TU

Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling by Paul Smaldino

Students will learn about agent-based modeling and how it is applied to study social phenomena in human and animal societies. Agent-based models are widely used to help us understand a wide range of topics, including but not limited to  cooperation, social learning, collective problem solving, opinion dynamics and polarization, segregation, the spread of disease, and the emergence of social norms. In this one-day workshop, students will receive an introduction to the philosophy of modeling and to some key models in the life and social sciences, and get hands on experience writing and analyzing simulation models using NetLogo, a widely used software package for agent-based modeling.

All students should bring a laptop computer. Before the workshop begins, you should download andinstall NetLogo, a free software tool for running and visualizing agent-based simulations. Available here

You will also benefit substantially by going through Tutorials #1-3 in the NetLogo User’s Manual before the start of the workshop—this is strongly recommended. Going through all three tutorials will probably take you a couple of hours. The manual is bundled with the NetLogo download but also available separately here

Preliminary program

10:00am – 11:00am Act I, in which we are introduced to models, and to each other.

11:00am – 12:30pm Act II, in which we are introduced to NetLogo.

12:30pm – 1:30pm Intermission, in which we are fed and exchange pleasantries.

1:30pm – 2:00pm Act III, in which we are treated to a guest lecture by Julia Eberlen.

2:00pm – 4:00pm Act IV, in which we design, build, and analyze a simple model of diffusion.

4:00pm – 5:00pm Act V, in which we discuss model assumptions, the relationship between modeling and empirical data, and the primacy of theory.

Venue

The Workshop on Agent-Based Modeling will take place on the campus of the Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, in the IPO building, 0.26.

Registration

Participation is free, but registration is required, and covers lunch and coffee breaks at the event.

Please register by September 4th using this link

Organizer

Dr. Daniël Lakens, d.lakens@tue.nl, Eindhoven University of Technology

Suggested readings

Though not required, the following recommended readings provide helpful introductions to models and modeling.

• Smaldino PE (2017) Models are stupid, and we need more of them. In: RR Vallacher, ANowak, SJ Read (eds), Computational models in social psychology (pp 311–331). Psychology Press. Download here

• Smaldino PE, Calanchini J, Pickett CL (2015) Theory development with agent-based models. Organizational Psychology Review 5(4): 300–317. Download here

• Epstein JM (1999) Agent-based computational models and generative social science. Complexity 4(5): 41–60.  Download here

• Eberlen J, Scholz G, Gagliolo M (2017) Simulate this! An introduction to agent-based models and their power to improve your research practice. International Review of Social Psychology 30(1): 149–160.  Download here

• Wang XF, Chen G (2003) Complex networks: Small-world, scale-free and beyond. IEEE Circuits and Systems Magazine 3(1): 6–20.  Download here

• Grimm V, et al. (2005) Pattern-oriented modeling of agent-based complex systems: Lessons from ecology. Science 310: 987–991.  Download here