Introduction

The 4TU research centre Humans & Technology (H&T) brings together the social sciences and technical sciences. Its goal is excellent research on innovative forms of human-technology interaction for smart social systems and spaces.
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Over the course of the past decade, the concept of what a “computer” is has seen a dramatic change. Our environment is full of computing devices, sensors, and actuators as humanoid robots are entering our lives. These recent developments in sensor and actuator technology enable new applications, like Google Glass, yet at the same time introduce and require new forms of human-technology interaction, such as real-time information processing and social signal processing. In order to understand and respond to complex, personal, and often implicit interaction signals, new techniques and research methods are required that in turn must be combined with relevant knowledge from the humanities (e.g. psychology, ergonomics, sociology). Figure 1 shows how the individual strengths of each of the three technical universities in the Netherlands will be combined in 4TU.H&T to tackle major challenges in the area of human-computer interaction for smart social systems and spaces.

 

Figure 1: The three technical universities in the Netherlands join forces to research and develop innovative forms of human-technology interaction

Over the course of the past decade, the concept of what a “computer” is has seen a dramatic change. Our environment is full of computing devices, sensors, and actuators as humanoid robots are entering our lives. These recent developments in sensor and actuator technology enable new applications, like Google Glass, yet at the same time introduce and require new forms of human-technology interaction, such as real-time information processing and social signal processing. In order to understand and respond to complex, personal, and often implicit interaction signals, new techniques and research methods are required that in turn must be combined with relevant knowledge from the humanities (e.g. psychology, ergonomics, sociology). Figure 1 shows how the individual strengths of each of the three technical universities in the Netherlands will be combined in 4TU.H&T to tackle major challenges in the area of human-computer interaction for smart social systems and spaces.

 

Figure 1: The three technical universities in the Netherlands join forces to research and develop innovative forms of human-technology interaction

Introduction

Over the course of the past decade, the concept of what a “computer” is has seen a dramatic change. Our environment is full of computing devices, sensors, and actuators as humanoid robots are entering our lives. These recent developments in sensor and actuator technology enable new applications, like Google Glass, yet at the same time introduce and require new forms of human-technology interaction, such as real-time information processing and social signal processing. In order to understand and respond to complex, personal, and often implicit interaction signals, new techniques and research methods are required that in turn must be combined with relevant knowledge from the humanities (e.g. psychology, ergonomics, sociology). Figure 1 shows how the individual strengths of each of the three technical universities in the Netherlands will be combined in 4TU.H&T to tackle major challenges in the area of human-computer interaction for smart social systems and spaces.

 

Figure 1: The three technical universities in the Netherlands join forces to research and develop innovative forms of human-technology interaction

Over the course of the past decade, the concept of what a “computer” is has seen a dramatic change. Our environment is full of computing devices, sensors, and actuators as humanoid robots are entering our lives. These recent developments in sensor and actuator technology enable new applications, like Google Glass, yet at the same time introduce and require new forms of human-technology interaction, such as real-time information processing and social signal processing. In order to understand and respond to complex, personal, and often implicit interaction signals, new techniques and research methods are required that in turn must be combined with relevant knowledge from the humanities (e.g. psychology, ergonomics, sociology). Figure 1 shows how the individual strengths of each of the three technical universities in the Netherlands will be combined in 4TU.H&T to tackle major challenges in the area of human-computer interaction for smart social systems and spaces.

 

Figure 1: The three technical universities in the Netherlands join forces to research and develop innovative forms of human-technology interaction