Reliability, Lifetime and System Health

4 July 2017
University of Twente
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Additional information:

  • Organization: UT
  • Course coordinator: prof. dr. ir. T. (Tiedo) Tinga
  • Event dates: July 4 - July 5
  • Other lecturers: dr. ir. Richard Loendersloot, Dr. Alberto Martinetti, Dr. Marielle Stoelinga

General

For any engineering system it is important that it keeps functioning for a certain period of time. This is the case for large macro‐scale systems like ships, aircraft, bridges and wind turbines, but also for small scale systems like electronics or micro‐electronic devices. This capability can be expressed in terms of reliability, life time or system health. The reliability quantifies the probability of failure within a certain time, the life time quantifies the (expected) time to failure of a system and the system health quantifies the evolution of the system condition from virgin to fully damaged.  

Knowledge of these concepts is required both during the design of a system and during its operation. In the design process, the focus will be on realizing a certain minimal reliability or life time. In that stage, understanding, modeling and quantifying the material behavior and associated failure mechanisms is essential. Once the system is in operation, the design cannot be changed anymore, but then the way of operating the system determines the loads on the components, and thus affects the reliability and life time. Being able to calculate the expected time to failure, or to monitor the evolution of the system health will assist in operating and maintaining the system properly.

This course provides an overview of the mathematical and physical concepts and principles required to analyze the reliability, life time and system health. The basic principles will be introduced and applications in both design and operation & maintenance will be shown. Also a practical lab session will be organized, where participants can experience the measurement of the system dynamics to assess the system health.

Additional information:

  • Organization: UT
  • Course coordinator: prof. dr. ir. T. (Tiedo) Tinga
  • Event dates: July 4 - July 5
  • Other lecturers: dr. ir. Richard Loendersloot, Dr. Alberto Martinetti, Dr. Marielle Stoelinga

General

For any engineering system it is important that it keeps functioning for a certain period of time. This is the case for large macro‐scale systems like ships, aircraft, bridges and wind turbines, but also for small scale systems like electronics or micro‐electronic devices. This capability can be expressed in terms of reliability, life time or system health. The reliability quantifies the probability of failure within a certain time, the life time quantifies the (expected) time to failure of a system and the system health quantifies the evolution of the system condition from virgin to fully damaged.  

Knowledge of these concepts is required both during the design of a system and during its operation. In the design process, the focus will be on realizing a certain minimal reliability or life time. In that stage, understanding, modeling and quantifying the material behavior and associated failure mechanisms is essential. Once the system is in operation, the design cannot be changed anymore, but then the way of operating the system determines the loads on the components, and thus affects the reliability and life time. Being able to calculate the expected time to failure, or to monitor the evolution of the system health will assist in operating and maintaining the system properly.

This course provides an overview of the mathematical and physical concepts and principles required to analyze the reliability, life time and system health. The basic principles will be introduced and applications in both design and operation & maintenance will be shown. Also a practical lab session will be organized, where participants can experience the measurement of the system dynamics to assess the system health.

Reliability, Lifetime and System Health

4 July 2017
University of Twente

Additional information:

  • Organization: UT
  • Course coordinator: prof. dr. ir. T. (Tiedo) Tinga
  • Event dates: July 4 - July 5
  • Other lecturers: dr. ir. Richard Loendersloot, Dr. Alberto Martinetti, Dr. Marielle Stoelinga

General

For any engineering system it is important that it keeps functioning for a certain period of time. This is the case for large macro‐scale systems like ships, aircraft, bridges and wind turbines, but also for small scale systems like electronics or micro‐electronic devices. This capability can be expressed in terms of reliability, life time or system health. The reliability quantifies the probability of failure within a certain time, the life time quantifies the (expected) time to failure of a system and the system health quantifies the evolution of the system condition from virgin to fully damaged.  

Knowledge of these concepts is required both during the design of a system and during its operation. In the design process, the focus will be on realizing a certain minimal reliability or life time. In that stage, understanding, modeling and quantifying the material behavior and associated failure mechanisms is essential. Once the system is in operation, the design cannot be changed anymore, but then the way of operating the system determines the loads on the components, and thus affects the reliability and life time. Being able to calculate the expected time to failure, or to monitor the evolution of the system health will assist in operating and maintaining the system properly.

This course provides an overview of the mathematical and physical concepts and principles required to analyze the reliability, life time and system health. The basic principles will be introduced and applications in both design and operation & maintenance will be shown. Also a practical lab session will be organized, where participants can experience the measurement of the system dynamics to assess the system health.

Additional information:

  • Organization: UT
  • Course coordinator: prof. dr. ir. T. (Tiedo) Tinga
  • Event dates: July 4 - July 5
  • Other lecturers: dr. ir. Richard Loendersloot, Dr. Alberto Martinetti, Dr. Marielle Stoelinga

General

For any engineering system it is important that it keeps functioning for a certain period of time. This is the case for large macro‐scale systems like ships, aircraft, bridges and wind turbines, but also for small scale systems like electronics or micro‐electronic devices. This capability can be expressed in terms of reliability, life time or system health. The reliability quantifies the probability of failure within a certain time, the life time quantifies the (expected) time to failure of a system and the system health quantifies the evolution of the system condition from virgin to fully damaged.  

Knowledge of these concepts is required both during the design of a system and during its operation. In the design process, the focus will be on realizing a certain minimal reliability or life time. In that stage, understanding, modeling and quantifying the material behavior and associated failure mechanisms is essential. Once the system is in operation, the design cannot be changed anymore, but then the way of operating the system determines the loads on the components, and thus affects the reliability and life time. Being able to calculate the expected time to failure, or to monitor the evolution of the system health will assist in operating and maintaining the system properly.

This course provides an overview of the mathematical and physical concepts and principles required to analyze the reliability, life time and system health. The basic principles will be introduced and applications in both design and operation & maintenance will be shown. Also a practical lab session will be organized, where participants can experience the measurement of the system dynamics to assess the system health.