GoC

4TU.CybSec Syllabus Governance of Cybersecurity (GoC)
4TU Delft
4TU Eindhoven
4TU Twente
4TU Wageningen

Credits: 5 EC

Motivation: The complexity of networked technologies and associated security and privacy threats requires interventions at the level of nation states and above to coordinate actions and prevent undesirable outcomes. For example, what actions are acceptable in military cyber operations? How to combat disinformation? Should encryption technology be regulated?

Synopsis: In this course, we study how cyber security policies and interventions materialise, how they are guided by (ethical) values and norms, and how they are influenced by stakeholder positions. We look in particular at how to analyse cyber security and privacy controversies, and possible solutions for the issues underlying those. The course builds on interdisciplinary perspectives based on governance studies, ethics, and communication science. Possible topics include: critical infrastructures, encryption, cyberwarfare, fake news / disinformation, e-voting, vulnerability disclosure.

Learning outcomes: After taking this course, the student is able to:

  • Analyse the roles of stakeholders in cybersecurity governance processes, and the values/norms they support;
  • Analyse how such values and norms are reflected in institutional arrangements, law, and technological infrastructures, and what this means for power and responsibility;
  • Analyse the origins of controversies related to the governance of cybersecurity, including the role of communication, explanation and framing;
  • Identify the governance problems that lead to controversies or institutional voids and propose solutions. 

Lecturers: Dr Wolter Pieters (TUD)

Education method: The first part of the course consists of presentation and discussion of theory (around 8 sessions of 2 hours). Literature (typically 2 texts per lecture, mostly scientific articles) will be made available via TUD's Brightspace. Students will be assigned specific tasks in the discussions. This is followed by a mid-term digital exam.

In the second part, students will do a research assignment on a relevant governance question in groups, resulting in a scientific paper. The project has to include both conceptual and empirical components. The topic is determined in consultation with the lecturers. Students will receive feedback on intermediate results. A statement on responsibilities and group cooperation has to be supplied with the final paper.

Examination: Mid-term digital exam (50%) and a group assignment (50%). Both parts need to be at least 5.0.

Core text: Mostly scientific articles

Credits: 5 EC

Motivation: The complexity of networked technologies and associated security and privacy threats requires interventions at the level of nation states and above to coordinate actions and prevent undesirable outcomes. For example, what actions are acceptable in military cyber operations? How to combat disinformation? Should encryption technology be regulated?

Synopsis: In this course, we study how cyber security policies and interventions materialise, how they are guided by (ethical) values and norms, and how they are influenced by stakeholder positions. We look in particular at how to analyse cyber security and privacy controversies, and possible solutions for the issues underlying those. The course builds on interdisciplinary perspectives based on governance studies, ethics, and communication science. Possible topics include: critical infrastructures, encryption, cyberwarfare, fake news / disinformation, e-voting, vulnerability disclosure.

Learning outcomes: After taking this course, the student is able to:

  • Analyse the roles of stakeholders in cybersecurity governance processes, and the values/norms they support;
  • Analyse how such values and norms are reflected in institutional arrangements, law, and technological infrastructures, and what this means for power and responsibility;
  • Analyse the origins of controversies related to the governance of cybersecurity, including the role of communication, explanation and framing;
  • Identify the governance problems that lead to controversies or institutional voids and propose solutions. 

Lecturers: Dr Wolter Pieters (TUD)

Education method: The first part of the course consists of presentation and discussion of theory (around 8 sessions of 2 hours). Literature (typically 2 texts per lecture, mostly scientific articles) will be made available via TUD's Brightspace. Students will be assigned specific tasks in the discussions. This is followed by a mid-term digital exam.

In the second part, students will do a research assignment on a relevant governance question in groups, resulting in a scientific paper. The project has to include both conceptual and empirical components. The topic is determined in consultation with the lecturers. Students will receive feedback on intermediate results. A statement on responsibilities and group cooperation has to be supplied with the final paper.

Examination: Mid-term digital exam (50%) and a group assignment (50%). Both parts need to be at least 5.0.

Core text: Mostly scientific articles

GoC

Credits: 5 EC

Motivation: The complexity of networked technologies and associated security and privacy threats requires interventions at the level of nation states and above to coordinate actions and prevent undesirable outcomes. For example, what actions are acceptable in military cyber operations? How to combat disinformation? Should encryption technology be regulated?

Synopsis: In this course, we study how cyber security policies and interventions materialise, how they are guided by (ethical) values and norms, and how they are influenced by stakeholder positions. We look in particular at how to analyse cyber security and privacy controversies, and possible solutions for the issues underlying those. The course builds on interdisciplinary perspectives based on governance studies, ethics, and communication science. Possible topics include: critical infrastructures, encryption, cyberwarfare, fake news / disinformation, e-voting, vulnerability disclosure.

Learning outcomes: After taking this course, the student is able to:

  • Analyse the roles of stakeholders in cybersecurity governance processes, and the values/norms they support;
  • Analyse how such values and norms are reflected in institutional arrangements, law, and technological infrastructures, and what this means for power and responsibility;
  • Analyse the origins of controversies related to the governance of cybersecurity, including the role of communication, explanation and framing;
  • Identify the governance problems that lead to controversies or institutional voids and propose solutions. 

Lecturers: Dr Wolter Pieters (TUD)

Education method: The first part of the course consists of presentation and discussion of theory (around 8 sessions of 2 hours). Literature (typically 2 texts per lecture, mostly scientific articles) will be made available via TUD's Brightspace. Students will be assigned specific tasks in the discussions. This is followed by a mid-term digital exam.

In the second part, students will do a research assignment on a relevant governance question in groups, resulting in a scientific paper. The project has to include both conceptual and empirical components. The topic is determined in consultation with the lecturers. Students will receive feedback on intermediate results. A statement on responsibilities and group cooperation has to be supplied with the final paper.

Examination: Mid-term digital exam (50%) and a group assignment (50%). Both parts need to be at least 5.0.

Core text: Mostly scientific articles

Credits: 5 EC

Motivation: The complexity of networked technologies and associated security and privacy threats requires interventions at the level of nation states and above to coordinate actions and prevent undesirable outcomes. For example, what actions are acceptable in military cyber operations? How to combat disinformation? Should encryption technology be regulated?

Synopsis: In this course, we study how cyber security policies and interventions materialise, how they are guided by (ethical) values and norms, and how they are influenced by stakeholder positions. We look in particular at how to analyse cyber security and privacy controversies, and possible solutions for the issues underlying those. The course builds on interdisciplinary perspectives based on governance studies, ethics, and communication science. Possible topics include: critical infrastructures, encryption, cyberwarfare, fake news / disinformation, e-voting, vulnerability disclosure.

Learning outcomes: After taking this course, the student is able to:

  • Analyse the roles of stakeholders in cybersecurity governance processes, and the values/norms they support;
  • Analyse how such values and norms are reflected in institutional arrangements, law, and technological infrastructures, and what this means for power and responsibility;
  • Analyse the origins of controversies related to the governance of cybersecurity, including the role of communication, explanation and framing;
  • Identify the governance problems that lead to controversies or institutional voids and propose solutions. 

Lecturers: Dr Wolter Pieters (TUD)

Education method: The first part of the course consists of presentation and discussion of theory (around 8 sessions of 2 hours). Literature (typically 2 texts per lecture, mostly scientific articles) will be made available via TUD's Brightspace. Students will be assigned specific tasks in the discussions. This is followed by a mid-term digital exam.

In the second part, students will do a research assignment on a relevant governance question in groups, resulting in a scientific paper. The project has to include both conceptual and empirical components. The topic is determined in consultation with the lecturers. Students will receive feedback on intermediate results. A statement on responsibilities and group cooperation has to be supplied with the final paper.

Examination: Mid-term digital exam (50%) and a group assignment (50%). Both parts need to be at least 5.0.

Core text: Mostly scientific articles